Etón American Red Cross ARCFR160R Microlink Self-Powered AM/FM/NOAA Weather Radio with Flashlight, Solar Power and Cell Phone Charger (Red)

Etón American Red Cross ARCFR160R Microlink Self-Powered AM/FM/NOAA Weather Radio with Flashlight, Solar Power and Cell Phone Charger (Red)

  • AM (520-1710 KHz) & FM (87-108MHz) NOAA weatherband & 8211
  • USB cell phone charger (USB cable not included) 3.5 mm headphone input Dimensions: 5.25& 8221
  • Accessories: owner& 8217;s manual, warranty card Specifications subject to change

Self-Powered AM/FM/NOAA Weather Radio with Flashlight, Solar Power, and Cell Phone Charger

Rating: (out of 29 reviews)

List Price: $ 40.00

Price: Too low to display

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5 Responses to “Etón American Red Cross ARCFR160R Microlink Self-Powered AM/FM/NOAA Weather Radio with Flashlight, Solar Power and Cell Phone Charger (Red)”

  • Sam A. Mead says:

    Review by Sam A. Mead for Etón American Red Cross ARCFR160R Microlink Self-Powered AM/FM/NOAA Weather Radio with Flashlight, Solar Power and Cell Phone Charger (Red)
    Rating:
    The Eton 160 is an incredible upgrade on exterior design. It seems slicker and better designed than the 150, but not necessarily a huge technological advance. Being able to charge on the go and use the solar to passively charge the device is a great backup.

    The three-led light is extremely bright and runs on extremely low battery power. The weatherbands tune in perfectly, with AM/FM stations sometimes requiring the antenna pulled completely out.

    The dynamo crank seems relatively strong, but slightly oversized when needing to crank it for a while–as in charging a phone.

    One thing has been added, a cell switch on the front of the radio, which designates all power to charging an added device. But one thing has been removed, the AC power adaptor option has been removed since the 150–it was unnecessary anyways.

    I haven’t worried about breaking the device and I’ve dropped the radio before–no problem resulted. I’ve already found it useful in a storm we had today in Colorado! Great device!

  • Ambergris says:

    Review by Ambergris for Etón American Red Cross ARCFR160R Microlink Self-Powered AM/FM/NOAA Weather Radio with Flashlight, Solar Power and Cell Phone Charger (Red)
    Rating:
    Weather radios are sort of a hobby of mine. There is just about no place I can go on my property that there isn’t one within reach somewhere. Six different brands are represented presently by what I own, including a more expensive Eton that is not my best radio. This small, (and I mean small) new line from Eton is a whole new animal to be sure. Its controls and design are very user friendly. And the reception on all channels, including the weather, is very loud and clear. Its true that the dial numbers for the AM FM are very small as some other reviewers have mentioned and can make it hard to tune accurately. But that is something common, as well as for me expected in a radio so small. What sets this unit apart from all the others I own in my opinion is its price and solar power. It is without a doubt the cheapest weather radio I have come across that is solar powered. Big, small, or otherwise. Even though one has been able to buy solar powered calculators at discount stores for less than $10 for years now, for some reason the weather radio industry has treated solar power as something still high tech and to be appreciated only in their most expensive units. My only other solar powered radio cost me over $60. The only possible down side that I should mention about this radio is that it does not take batteries. It would have been nice if they included that option. But they didn’t and its either the solar power or crank. This could be a very big negative for some folks who would feel comfortable knowing they could just stick some batteries in it if all else fails. Although 90% of the time the solar power is all you should ever need, if you will routinely keep this in a rather dark place, or happen to be lost out in the savage wilderness someplace with this radio in a continuous cloud cover, be ready to do a whole heap of crankin’. All in all, its finally nice to see a very reasonably priced unit that is solar powered and of a very quality build and design as well. I highly recommend the Eton for a portable unit that can be taken anywhere easily, powered effortlessly, and gives quality performance all in one package….

  • William L. Drevo, Jr. says:

    Review by William L. Drevo, Jr. for Etón American Red Cross ARCFR160R Microlink Self-Powered AM/FM/NOAA Weather Radio with Flashlight, Solar Power and Cell Phone Charger (Red)
    Rating:
    The reasons this Eton-manufactured emergency radio is the ideal emergency radio are: 1) small, compact size, 2) shock-absorbing case, 3) sensitive AM/FM/NOAA Weather tuner picks up weak signals, 4) handy 3-LED flashlight on left-hand end of the radio’s case, 5) Earphone jack under dust cover on the right-hand side of the case, 6) USB port under same dust cover on the right-hand side of the case, 7) All radio bands will run 4-5 hours at low volume on full charge of the internal NiMH battery, 8) Solar panel on top of the radio’s case is strong enough to power the radio indefinitely (as long as the solar panel is ‘seeing’ daylight), 9) the internal NiMH can be re-charged via the solar panel during daylight hours, an external transformer or the hand-cranked dynamo. You get all of these features for the low price of $30, plus free ‘Super Saver’ shipping from Amazon.Com. You can pay a lot more for an emergency radio and get a whole lot less!

  • Dr.Scooter says:

    Review by Dr.Scooter for Etón American Red Cross ARCFR160R Microlink Self-Powered AM/FM/NOAA Weather Radio with Flashlight, Solar Power and Cell Phone Charger (Red)
    Rating:
    First, never been used in a storm but seems pretty good. I like the Cell Phone Charger idea BUT bear in mind it is ONLY a USB plug, does say that on box. The good news is if your phone charges through a USB plug you are set, works for my Razr but you will need to get a USB to “your” phone if you want that. However, seemingly it will charge up your MP3 too. I was in “Dolly” last year, being from the mid-west had nothing like this so we could only get information by Cell Phone till they went down. We have a family condo on South Padre Island and I purchased this unit to leave down there for the future, also got one for home as a just in case. Is small, seemingly well made and well thought out. A few cranks (90 seconds for half hour of radio use) seems to power up the radio and light and with minimal effort or sunshine the main unit can be fully charged. I’ve yet to try to charge up a cell phone but from the directions “10-15 minutes of cranking may result in 1 or more minutes of talk time”. Oh well, usually lots of boring time in a disaster to fill. For the $30 seems decent and cheap enough to just have “in case” I would at least have been more informed about Hurricane Dolly, all I can say is while I was in the middle of Dolly all my information about the storm came to me by Cell Phone from St.Louis, MO and Bellingham, WA we lost the Cell about 5 or 6 hours into the storm. Again, decent well made and very compact, flash light is bright, although LED have a short range and it is not to be confused with like a flashlight Police or real rescue crews would use, but it will get one around inside or check a fuse box kind of thing.

  • Mark Wagner says:

    Review by Mark Wagner for Etón American Red Cross ARCFR160R Microlink Self-Powered AM/FM/NOAA Weather Radio with Flashlight, Solar Power and Cell Phone Charger (Red)
    Rating:
    This radio is an excellent radio for the price. No, it is not a top-end emergency radio, but it should work rather well for anyone looking for a basic AM/FM/Weather radio with both a solar and hand-crank charging option. I purchased mine about a year ago and used it only occasionally for the first few months. Then I placed it on a shelf with limited light and there it sat for about six to eight months. About six weeks ago I dusted it off and it actually worked for about an hour or so with no hand-crank charging. Later that day I sat it in the front window where it would get plenty of direct sun light. A couple days later I picked it up from the window and have been using it a few hours each day since; some of those days it was used for more than six hours in the basement. I have not needed to crank it at all, but did crank charge it for about one minute total just while playing with it – for the record. Since then, I have been keeping it on the shelf out in the open where it is exposed to normal room daylight, no direct sunlight. The charging light does not light up in this setting, and I would not expect it to. I have occasionally taken it out on the front porch to sit a listen where there is direct sunlight, but only for about an hour or so each week. I really like the idea of not having to buy batteries, and the convenience of knowing I always have a charged radio.

    The flashlight is minimal, but I would not expect more from an LED light source. I have my 6-D-Cell Mag light if I need a powerful (luxury) light source.

    Tuning the radio is a bit sensitive and can be difficult to fine tune. I would consider this to be a SIGNIFICANT problem for an elderly person or anyone without the use of fine motor skills in their hands; but for me it is a minor hassle I am willing and able to deal with. I have considered getting the Eaton FR600 for its digital tuner. The reviews for that model suggest the battery life is pretty bad, so I have decided to wait for an improved model. For now, my FR160 is just fine. I would consider giving this 5-stars if the fine-tuning was much easier.

    The USB charge does work, but know that it will not charge an iPhone 3Gs. This is more a problem/restriction of the iPhone 3Gs (a widely discussed complaint across the Internet for many-many generic charging devices) and is not because of the radio. Charging my old Samsung phone was not a problem.

    The weather bands do pick up a signal, but to be absolutely honest, I have not used it much to provide any real opinion.

    The hand-crank charger feels solid enough (I wouldn’t abuse it) and tucks away securely when not used. I have found the manual crank-charger will provide about 25-30 minutes of radio time (at about 1/4 to 1/3 volume) for every minute of crank-charging. I average about 2 cranks per second or about 120 rotation per minute. Now I just count to 120 or so instead of watching the clock. This play-time per craink-time yeild has been very acceptable for me. After two minutes of crank-charging my hand does begins to tire a little, but just a little. If I leave the radio in a place with good direct sunlight when not using it, changing via the crank is never even needed.

    In short, it works for what I want – a radio that that can be charged by sunlight or by hand-crank when absolutely necessary. If you want the construction and feature-set of a $100+ radio – buy a $100+ radio. But, for $30 (or less), I am pleased with the FR160.

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