How are hurricanes formed?

Question by Addison: How are hurricanes formed?
I already know how hurricanes form, but i want some more depth in answering the questions on the up coming final. thanks:)

Best answer:

Answer by CSO
Hurricanes begin as tropical storms over the warm moist waters of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans near the equator. (Near the Phillippines and the China Sea, hurricanes are called typhoons.) As the moisture evaporates it rises until enormous amounts of heated moist air are twisted high in the atmosphere. The winds begin to circle counterclockwise north of the equator or clockwise south of the equator. The reatively peaceful center of the hurricane is called the eye. Around this center winds move at speeds between 74 and 200 miles per hour. As long as the hurricane remains over waters of 79F or warmer, it continues to pull moisture from the surface and grow in size and force. When a hurricane crosses land or cooler waters, it loses its source of power, and its wind gradually slow until they are no longer of hurricane force–less than 74 miles per hour.

Hurricanes over the Atlantic often begin near Africa, drift west on the Trade Winds, and veer north as they meet the prevalling winds coming eastward across North America. Hurricanes over the Eastern Pacific begin in the warm waters off the Central American and Mexican coasts. Eastern and Central Pacific storms are called “hurricanes.” Storms to the west of the International Date Line are called “typhoons.”

Because of the destructive force of hurricanes during late summer and early autumn, scientists constantly monitor them with satellites and sometimes even fly airplane surveillance to keep track of tropical storms that might develop into hurricanes.

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One Response to “How are hurricanes formed?”

  • Cheryl says:

    How Hurricanes Form

    A tropical thunderstorm can grow into a massive hurricane under certain conditions. Sometimes several thunderstorms start rotating around a central area of low pressure. This is called a tropical depression. If the depression strengthens so that winds reach at least 39 mph, it is called a tropical storm. And if wind speeds increase to more than 74 mph, it is called a tropical cyclone or hurricane.

    Once formed, hurricanes take energy from the warm ocean water to become stronger. A storm will strengthen if there is a supply of warm, moist air to feed it. Warm, moist air is found above warm, tropical ocean waters. While a hurricane is over warm water it will continue to grow. A hurricane dies when it moves away from the tropics. When a hurricane moves into areas with cooler ocean water, it weakens. It will also weaken if it travels over land.

    The rotation of the storm is due to the Coriolis Effect, a product of the Earth’s rotation. This causes the air being drawn into the central low pressure to curve. The air rises as it rotates. This rising air, which is saturated with water, cools and condenses, forming clouds. Hurricanes do not occur within 300 miles (500 kilometers) of the equator because there is no Coriolis Effect at the equator.

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